Login or Register for FREE!
Subelement T1
COMMISSION’S RULES
Section T1B
Frequency allocations; Emission modes; Spectrum sharing; Transmissions near band edges; Contacting the International Space Station; Power output
Which of the following frequency ranges are available for phone operation by Technician licensees?
  • 28.050 MHz to 28.150 MHz
  • 28.100 MHz to 28.300 MHz
  • Correct Answer
    28.300 MHz to 28.500 MHz
  • 28.500 MHz to 28.600 MHz

Technician licensees have access to the 10-meter band between 28.000 and 28.500, however below 28.300 use is limited to CW and digital modes.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/10-meter_band#United_States

Last edited by abartlett. Register to edit

Tags: none

Which amateurs may contact the International Space Station (ISS) on VHF bands?
  • Any amateur holding a General class or higher license
  • Correct Answer
    Any amateur holding a Technician class or higher license
  • Any amateur holding a General class or higher license who has applied for and received approval from NASA
  • Any amateur holding a Technician class or higher license who has applied for and received approval from NASA

There are no special requirements as far as licensing goes for talking to a satellite or space station; it's a station like any other, it just happens to be in a very remote location. As long as you are allowed to transmit on the uplink frequency (the frequency the satellite listens on) you can communicate through it.

Since any amateur radio operator with a Technician or higher class license can operate on the 2 meter and 70 cm bands, that means that those operators can also make contact with a station in space.

Last edited by shotgun93. Register to edit

Tags: license class 2 meter 70 cm arrl chapter 6 arrl module 16

Which frequency is in the 6 meter amateur band?
  • 49.00 MHz
  • Correct Answer
    52.525 MHz
  • 28.50 MHz
  • 222.15 MHz

As an aid, convert the wavelength to frequency:

\begin{align} f_\text{ (MHz)} = \frac{300}{\lambda _\text{ (meters)}} \end{align}

So in this case: \begin{align} f_\text{ (MHz)} &= \frac{300}{6 \text{ m}} \approx 50 \text{ MHz} \end{align}

52.525 MHz is the only frequency in the 6 meter band.


Note:
The distractor answer 49 MHz is even closer to 6 meters in length, however, is outside of the US amateur 6 meter frequency allocation, which is the range 50.0 MHz - 54.0 MHz. The sub-band 50.0 MHz to 50.1 MHz is restricted to CW (Continuous Wave) only.

Last edited by jbongo. Register to edit

Tags: frequencies 6 meter arrl chapter 7 arrl module 17

Which amateur band includes 146.52 MHz?
  • 6 meters
  • 20 meters
  • 70 centimeters
  • Correct Answer
    2 meters

As an aid, you can convert the frequency (\(f\)) to wavelength in meters (\(\lambda\)) :

\begin{align} \lambda_\text{ (m)} = \frac{300}{f_\text{(MHz)}} \end{align}

(300 is approximately the number of Mm/sec light travels in a vacuum.) So in this case: \begin{align} \lambda_\text{ (m)} &= \frac{300}{146.52 \text{ MHz}} = 2.05 \text{ m} \approx 2 \text{ m} \end{align}

144-148Mhz is the frequency range allocated to ham radio operators in the 2 meter band, with 144.0-144.1 being allocated for CW mode only.

Last edited by rjstone. Register to edit

Tags: frequencies 2 meter arrl chapter 7 arrl module 17

How may amateurs use the 219 to 220 MHz segment of 1.25 meter band?
  • Spread spectrum only
  • Fast-scan television only
  • Emergency traffic only
  • Correct Answer
    Fixed digital message forwarding systems only

I don't know any really good tricks for remembering these, except to point out that whenever there is a part of the band that is reserved for Data it is generally the lowest part, and so it makes sense that the range at the bottom of the 220 MHz range would be for data. In point of fact, all non-data frequencies allowed to ham operators in the 1.25 meter band (222 MHz) are from 222.0 to 225.0 MHz, and that block allows phone and image.

219 to 220MHz is for fixed digital message forwarding systems only.

See the ARRL Frequency Chart for a handy one-page reference to band privileges.

Last edited by inn vnix ginner. Register to edit

Tags: memorizing frequencies digital modes arrl chapter 7 arrl module 17

On which HF bands does a Technician class operator have phone privileges?
  • None
  • Correct Answer
    10 meter band only
  • 80 meter, 40 meter, 15 meter, and 10 meter bands
  • 30 meter band only

Technician class operators are much more limited in their HF band privileges than General or Amateur Extra class operators. Remember that while Technician class operators have CW privileges on some other HF bands, they only have Phone, RTTY, and Data privileges on a portion of the 10m band.

This is why if you have an HF radio you will want to get your General class license sooner rather than later!

See the ARRL Frequency Chart for a handy one-page reference to band privileges.

An easy way to remember this is to look for the "1" first. Technician class is the first license.

Last edited by k0fe. Register to edit

Tags: arrl chapter 7 arrl module 17

Which of the following VHF/UHF band segments are limited to CW only?
  • Correct Answer
    50.0 MHz to 50.1 MHz and 144.0 MHz to 144.1 MHz
  • 219 MHz to 220 MHz and 420.0 MHz to 420.1 MHz
  • 902.0 MHz to 902.1 MHz
  • All these choices are correct

This is a trick question intended to confuse guessing attempts. There are no UHF (300-3000MHz) frequencies reserved for CW! But there are 0.1MHz regions of VHF reserved for CW on the lowest part of the 6m (50Mhz) and 2m (144MHz) bands for all amateur operators.

Just remember that above VHF, no frequencies are limited to CW.

See the AARL Frequency Chart for a handy one-page reference to band privileges.

Last edited by rjstone. Register to edit

Tags: morse code frequency privileges arrl chapter 7 arrl module 17

How are US amateurs restricted in segments of bands where the Amateur Radio Service is secondary?
  • Correct Answer
    U.S. amateurs may find non-amateur stations in those segments, and must avoid interfering with them
  • U.S. amateurs must give foreign amateur stations priority in those segments
  • International communications are not permitted in those segments
  • Digital transmissions are not permitted in those segments

Secondary means that while amateur radio is allowed to use that band, amateurs are not considered the primary user. Therefore amateurs must give priority access to the primary users by not interfering with them.

The answers involving foreign amateur stations are not correct, they are still amateur radio operators, so they aren't protected by this rule. The only proscription on talking to foreign amateur stations is when their country does not allow communications with our country - there aren't many of those, but there are a few.

In the US, digital transmissions are allowed on the entire 70 cm band, so this choice is also not correct.

Last edited by w2rct. Register to edit

Tags: frequency privileges secondary use arrl chapter 7 arrl module 17

Why should you not set your transmit frequency to be exactly at the edge of an amateur band or sub-band?
  • To allow for calibration error in the transmitter frequency display
  • So that modulation sidebands do not extend beyond the band edge
  • To allow for transmitter frequency drift
  • Correct Answer
    All these choices are correct

All of the choices are correct. Here is each one explained:

  1. The frequency you set on a transmitter is actually the carrier frequency which is either at the center of the total bandwidth that you're using (for FM or non-SSB) or at the top or bottom of the bandwidth (for SSB). When you transmit on a frequency, you will actually use a little bit of bandwidth above and/or below that frequency (referred to as deviation) even with a properly calibrated transmitter!

  2. Not all transmitters are calibrated perfectly, and so if you set your transmitter exactly on a specific frequency, say the bottom edge of the amateur portion of the band even when using upper sideband (USB), you may actually be transmitting illegally out of band, due to calibration error.

  3. Some transmitters may drift a little bit off frequency during transmission as well (due to temperature changes as the radio gets warmer etc).

Last edited by wwrr. Register to edit

Tags: best practices frequencies arrl chapter 5 arrl module 11

Where may SSB phone be used in amateur bands above 50 MHz?
  • Only in sub-bands allocated to General class or higher licensees
  • Only on repeaters
  • Correct Answer
    In at least some segment of all these bands
  • On any band if the power is limited to 25 watts

Amateur radio operators have some portion of all amateur bands above 50 MHz where they are permitted to use SSB.

SSB is an abbreviation for Single Side Band, a type of amplitude modulation.

"Phone" means "voice."

Last edited by k6yxh. Register to edit

Tags: arrl chapter 6 arrl module 14

What is the maximum peak envelope power output for Technician class operators in their HF band segments?
  • Correct Answer
    200 watts
  • 100 watts
  • 50 watts
  • 10 watts

This is a FCC regulation you just have to memorize. ('HF' has 2 letters, limit is 2-hundred W) Technician class operators are limited to 200W PEP (Peak Envelope Power) on any part of an HF band that they're otherwise allowed to use.

As always, FCC 97.313 says "An amateur station must use the minimum transmitter power necessary to carry out the desired communications."

Last edited by sensiblebk. Register to edit

Tags: arrl chapter 7 arrl module 17

Except for some specific restrictions, what is the maximum peak envelope power output for Technician class operators using frequencies above 30 MHz?
  • 50 watts
  • 100 watts
  • 500 watts
  • Correct Answer
    1500 watts

For frequencies above HF frequencies (>30MHz), Technician class operators are generally allowed to use the full power of 1500W PEP allowed for amateur transmissions.

§97.313 Transmitter power standards.

(a) An amateur station must use the minimum transmitter power necessary to carry out the desired communications.

(b) No station may transmit with a transmitter power exceeding 1.5 kW PEP.

See CFR §97.313.

Last edited by rjstone. Register to edit

Tags: arrl chapter 7 arrl module 17

Go to T1A Go to T2A