Login or Register for FREE!
Subelement E1
COMMISSION'S RULES
Section E1A
Operating Standards: frequency privileges; emission standards; automatic message forwarding; frequency sharing; stations aboard ships or aircraft
When using a transceiver that displays the carrier frequency of phone signals, which of the following displayed frequencies represents the highest frequency at which a properly adjusted USB emission will be totally within the band?
  • The exact upper band edge
  • 300 Hz below the upper band edge
  • 1 kHz below the upper band edge
  • 3 kHz below the upper band edge

Since most phone signals using SSB take up approximately 3 kHz of bandwidth, for Upper Side Band the transmission would have to be 3 kHz below the upper edge in order to not exceed our privileges.

Last edited by nojiratz. Register to edit

Tags: phone ssb bandwidth

When using a transceiver that displays the carrier frequency of phone signals, which of the following displayed frequencies represents the lowest frequency at which a properly adjusted LSB emission will be totally within the band?
  • The exact lower band edge
  • 300 Hz above the lower band edge
  • 1 kHz above the lower band edge
  • 3 kHz above the lower band edge

The SSB take up approximately 3khz of bandwidth for Lower Side Band (LSB) so you need to tune the radio 3khz above the lower edge so you will not be transmitting outside of your bandwidth privileges.

Last edited by brankin. Register to edit

Tags: phone ssb bandwidth

With your transceiver displaying the carrier frequency of phone signals, you hear a station calling CQ on 14.349 MHz USB. Is it legal to return the call using upper sideband on the same frequency?
  • Yes, because you were not the station calling CQ
  • Yes, because the displayed frequency is within the 20 meter band
  • No, the sideband will extend beyond the band edge
  • No, U.S. stations are not permitted to use phone emissions above 14.340 MHz

Remember that your actual signal extends to either side of the frequency you are transmitting on. A Single Side Band (SSB) transmission usually uses between 300–3,400 Hz of bandwidth, so as much as half of that up and down from the frequency you are on.

The upper limit for the 14 MHz (20 meter) band is 14.350 MHz (see ARRL's band chart) and so your signal if you transmit on 14.349 MHz could easily go above 14.350 MHz and you would be transmitting out of band.

Last edited by wileyj2956. Register to edit

Tags: 20 meters bandwidth frequencies ssb

With your transceiver displaying the carrier frequency of phone signals, you hear a DX station calling CQ on 3.601 MHz LSB. Is it legal to return the call using lower sideband on the same frequency?
  • Yes, because the DX station initiated the contact
  • Yes, because the displayed frequency is within the 75 meter phone band segment
  • No, the sideband will extend beyond the edge of the phone band segment
  • No, U.S. stations are not permitted to use phone emissions below 3.610 MHz

Remember that your actual signal extends to either side of the frequency you are transmitting on. A Single Side Band (SSB) transmission is considered to have 3 kHz of bandwidth below the carrier, so you should set your carrier at least 3 kHz higher than the lower edge of the 80 meter band's voice portion when operating LSB.

The lower limit for phone in the 3MHz (80 meter) band is 3.600 MHz, so the sidebands of your signal if you transmit on 3.601 Mhz could easily go below 3.600 MHz and you would be transmitting in a part of the band where phone is not allowed.

Last edited by w6dxn. Register to edit

Tags: international morse code bandwidth 75/80 meters

What is the maximum power output permitted on the 60 meter band?
  • 50 watts PEP effective radiated power relative to an isotropic radiator
  • 50 watts PEP effective radiated power relative to a dipole
  • 100 watts PEP effective radiated power relative to the gain of a half-wave dipole
  • 100 watts PEP effective radiated power relative to an isotropic radiator

The 60 meter band has special restrictions including the restriction of radiated power relative to the gain of a half-wavelength dipole antenna which is 100 watts PEP. If the antenna is something other than a half-wavelength antenna, then the power output must be adjusted.

If you have a 3 dBd gain antenna which would be twice the gain of a dipole, then you would have to reduce the output power to 50 watts.

brankin

Hint: The only answer has "half-wave dipole" in it.

-KE0IPR

Last edited by wileyj2956. Register to edit

Tags: 60 meters transmit power rules and regulations

Where must the carrier frequency of a CW signal be set to comply with FCC rules for 60 meter operation?
  • At the lowest frequency of the channel
  • At the center frequency of the channel
  • At the highest frequency of the channel
  • On any frequency where the signal's sidebands are within the channel

All signals transmitted by an amateur on 60 meter channels must be centered within the channel.

-brankin

Memory Aid: Think "sixty-center"

-KE0IPR

Last edited by ke0ipr. Register to edit

Tags: none

Which amateur band requires transmission on specific channels rather than on a range of frequencies?
  • 12 meter band
  • 17 meter band
  • 30 meter band
  • 60 meter band

In order to maintain compatibility with non-amateur stations who are the primary users of this band, the five channels which are 2.8 kHz wide are allocated to the amateur band (5332 kHz, 5348 kHz, 5368 kHz, 5373 kHz, and 5405 kHz) and must be centered in the channel with USB, data and CW signals.

Last edited by brankin. Register to edit

Tags: 60 meters rules and regulations

If a station in a message forwarding system inadvertently forwards a message that is in violation of FCC rules, who is primarily accountable for the rules violation?
  • The control operator of the packet bulletin board station
  • The control operator of the originating station
  • The control operators of all the stations in the system
  • The control operators of all the stations in the system not authenticating the source from which they accept communications

Message forwarding systems are just that -- systems that forward messages.

While control operators of message forwarding stations are expected to do what is reasonable to prevent incorrect use of their station, the primary responsibility for the contents of a message still belongs to the station that sends the original message.

Last edited by schubie1. Register to edit

Tags: control operator rules and regulations message forwarding

What is the first action you should take if your digital message forwarding station inadvertently forwards a communication that violates FCC rules?
  • Discontinue forwarding the communication as soon as you become aware of it
  • Notify the originating station that the communication does not comply with FCC rules
  • Notify the nearest FCC Field Engineer's office
  • Discontinue forwarding all messages

Primary responsibility for the contents of a message belongs to the originating station but your station still has the responsibility to do what is reasonable to ensure that the transmissions that it sends (including forwarded messages) do not violate FCC rules.

Basically that just means that if you discover that your station is forwarding something that violates rules, take steps so that that communication is no longer being forwarded.

Last edited by kd7bbc. Register to edit

Tags: digital modes rules and regulations message forwarding

If an amateur station is installed aboard a ship or aircraft, what condition must be met before the station is operated?
  • Its operation must be approved by the master of the ship or the pilot in command of the aircraft
  • The amateur station operator must agree not to transmit when the main radio of the ship or aircraft is in use
  • The amateur station must have a power supply that is completely independent of the main ship or aircraft power supply
  • The amateur operator must have an FCC Marine or Aircraft endorsement on his or her amateur license

Just remember that on a ship or plane the captain is in charge =] That could be the captain/master of a seagoing vessel or the captain/pilot of an airplane. In either case you should not use an amateur radio station without permission from the captain.

Last edited by kd7bbc. Register to edit

Tags: aircraft/ship operation station types

Which of the following describes authorization or licensing required when operating an amateur station aboard a U.S.-registered vessel in international waters?
  • Any amateur license with an FCC Marine or Aircraft endorsement
  • Any FCC-issued amateur license
  • Only General class or higher amateur licenses
  • An unrestricted Radiotelephone Operator Permit

Amateur Radio stations aboard a US-registered vessel in international waters are under the same guidelines as any station on US soil. You need a FCC-issued ham license or a reciprocal permit for an alien amateur license (meaning a license from another country) to operate your license on US soil, so you need that on a US-registered vessel as well.

Last edited by mvs90. Register to edit

Tags: aircraft/ship operation international

With your transceiver displaying the carrier frequency of CW signals, you hear a DX station's CQ on 3.500 MHz. Is it legal to return the call using CW on the same frequency?
  • Yes, the DX station initiated the contact
  • Yes, the displayed frequency is within the 80 meter CW band segment
  • No, one of the sidebands of the CW signal will be out of the band
  • No, U.S. stations are not permitted to use CW emissions below 3.525 MHz

Even though the bandwidth required for a CW signal is very narrow, it is not nothing. Therefore, if you transmit CW with your transceiver displaying "3.500 MHz" that will be the center of your signal and so your sidebands will extend both above and below that frequency.

3.500 MHz is the lower limit of the part of the 80 meter band that Amateur Radio operators are allowed to use, so if your sidebands extend below 3.500 MHz (which they would in this case) you are transmitting out of band.

Last edited by ctrstocks. Register to edit

Tags: morse code bandwidth 75/80 meters international

Who must be in physical control of the station apparatus of an amateur station aboard any vessel or craft that is documented or registered in the United States?
  • Only a person with an FCC Marine Radio
  • Any person holding an FCC issued amateur license or who is authorized for alien reciprocal operation
  • Only a person named in an amateur station license grant
  • Any person named in an amateur station license grant or a person holding an unrestricted Radiotelephone Operator Permit

The rules for operating an amateur radio station aboard a vessel or craft in the US are roughly the same as the rules governing any other station in the United States.

Specifically, the control operator (the person in physical control of the station apparatus) must either hold a valid FCC-issued amateur radio license or they must be authorized for alien reciprocal operation -- that is, they can operate if they are an alien (non-US citizen) holding a license in a country with whom the US has a reciprocal operating agreement allowing them to operate in the United States with their alien amateur radio license.

Last edited by kd7bbc. Register to edit

Tags: aircraft/ship operation station types

What is the maximum bandwidth for a data emission on 60 meters?
  • 60 Hz
  • 170 Hz
  • 1.5 kHz
  • 2.8 kHz

The maximum bandwidth for a data emission on 60 meters is 2.8 kHz.


Amateurs are not the primary users on the 60 meter band so operation on 60 meters is restricted to five 2.8 kHz wide channels centered on

  • 5332 kHz,
  • 5348 kHz,
  • 5368 kHz,
  • 5373 kHz, and
  • 5405 kHz

...with USB, data, and CW signals.

Last edited by qubit. Register to edit

Tags: none

Go to E1B