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Subelement E1
COMMISSION'S RULES
Section E1D
Amateur satellites: definitions and purpose; license requirements for space stations; available frequencies and bands; telecommand and telemetry operations; restrictions, and special provisions; notification requirements
What is the definition of the term telemetry?
  • One-way transmission of measurements at a distance from the measuring instrument
  • Two-way radiotelephone transmissions in excess of 1000 feet
  • Two-way single channel transmissions of data
  • One-way transmission that initiates, modifies, or terminates the functions of a device at a distance

Coming from the prefix "tele" (distant) and the suffix "metry" meaning "the process, art, or science of measuring", telemetry is no more than simply "distance measurements".

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What is the amateur satellite service?
  • A radio navigation service using satellites for the purpose of self training, intercommunication and technical studies carried out by amateurs
  • A spacecraft launching service for amateur-built satellites
  • A radio communications service using amateur radio stations on satellites
  • A radio communications service using stations on Earth satellites for public service broadcast

FCC 97.3(a)(2)(2) Amateur radio services are defined as the following three services The amateur service, the amateur satellite service and the radio amateur civil emergency service.

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What is a telecommand station in the amateur satellite service?
  • An amateur station located on the Earth's surface for communication with other Earth stations by means of Earth satellites
  • An amateur station that transmits communications to initiate, modify or terminate functions of a space station
  • An amateur station located more than 50 km above the Earth's surface
  • An amateur station that transmits telemetry consisting of measurements of upper atmosphere

FCC 97.3(a)(44) Telecommand station. An amateur station that transmits communications to initiate, modify or terminate functions of a space station.

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What is an Earth station in the amateur satellite service?
  • An amateur station within 50 km of the Earth's surface intended for communications with amateur stations by means of objects in space
  • An amateur station that is not able to communicate using amateur satellites
  • An amateur station that transmits telemetry consisting of measurement of upper atmosphere
  • Any amateur station on the surface of the Earth

FCC 97.3(a)(16)) Earth station. An amateur station located on, or within 50 km of, the Earth’s surface intended for communications with space stations or with other Earth stations by means of one or more other objects in space.

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What class of licensee is authorized to be the control operator of a space station?
  • All except Technician Class
  • Only General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class
  • Any class with appropriate operator privileges
  • Only Amateur Extra Class

Part 97.207 Space Station: begins with: (a) Any amateur station may be a space station. A holder of any class operator license may be the control operator of a space station, subject to the privileges of the class of operator license held by the control operator. (emphasis added)

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Which of the following is a requirement of a space station?
  • The space station must be capable of terminating transmissions by telecommand when directed by the FCC
  • The space station must cease all transmissions after 5 years
  • The space station must be capable of changing its orbit whenever such a change is ordered by NASA
  • All of these choices are correct

From Part 97.207 Space Station:

(b) A space station must be capable of effecting a cessation of transmissions by telecommand whenever such cessation is ordered by the FCC.

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Which amateur service HF bands have frequencies authorized for space stations?
  • Only the 40 m, 20 m, 17 m, 15 m, 12 m and 10 m bands
  • Only the 40 m, 20 m, 17 m, 15 m and 10 m bands
  • Only the 40 m, 30 m, 20 m, 15 m, 12 m and 10 m bands
  • All HF bands

An easy way to remember this one is that every year has 12 months (12m band) but every month doesn't have 30 days. there is only one answer that has 12m without 30m - OR - There's always 4 even and 2 odd balls in space. 4 even numbered bands and two odd numbered bands. - KF4IRE

From Part 97.207 Space Station:

(c) The following frequency bands and segments are authorized to space stations:

(1) The 17 m, 15 m, 12 m, and 10 m bands, 6 m, 4 m, 2 m and 1 m bands; and

(2) The 7.0-7.1 MHz, 14.00-14.25 MHz, 144-146 MHz, 435-438 MHz, 1260-1270 MHz, and 2400-2450 MHz, 3.40-3.41 GHz, 5.83-5.85 GHz, 10.45-10.50 GHz, and 24.00-24.05 GHz segments.

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Which VHF amateur service bands have frequencies available for space stations?
  • 6 meters and 2 meters
  • 6 meters, 2 meters, and 1.25 meters
  • 2 meters and 1.25 meters
  • 2 meters

From Part 97.207 Space Station::

(c) The following frequency bands and segments are authorized to space stations:

...

(2) The 7.0-7.1 MHz, 14.00-14.25 MHz, 144-146 MHz, 435-438 MHz, 1260-1270 MHz, and 2400-2450 MHz, 3.40-3.41 GHz, 5.83-5.85 GHz, 10.45-10.50 GHz, and 24.00-24.05 GHz segments.

144-146 MHz covers a portion of the 2 meter band.

 


For your general education, note that the following spectrum is also authorized to space stations:

(1) The 17 m, 15 m, 12 m, and 10 m bands, 6 mm, 4 mm, 2 mm and 1 mm bands;

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Which UHF amateur service bands have frequencies available for a space station?
  • 70 cm only
  • 70 cm and 13 cm
  • 70 cm and 33 cm
  • 33 cm and 13 cm

Part 97 Sec. 97.207 Space station (c) The following frequency bands and segments are authorized to space stations:

(1) The 17 m, 15 m, 12 m, and 10 m bands, 6 m, 4 m, 2 m and 70cm bands; and (2) The 7.0–7.1 MHz, 14.00–14.25 MHz, 144–146 MHz, 435–438 MHz (70 cm) , 2400–2450 MHz (13 cm), 3.40–3.41 GHz, 5.83–5.85 GHz, 10.45–10.50 GHz, and 24.00–24.05 GHz segments.

Silly memory tool: In 1970 (70cm) Apollo 13 (13cm) had a problem.

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Which amateur stations are eligible to be telecommand stations?
  • Any amateur station designated by NASA
  • Any amateur station so designated by the space station licensee, subject to the privileges of the class of operator license held by the control operator
  • Any amateur station so designated by the ITU
  • All of these choices are correct

FCC 97.211(a)Any amateur station designated by the licensee of a space station is eligible to transmit as a telecommand station for that space station, subject to the privileges of the class of operator license held by the control operator.

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Which amateur stations are eligible to operate as Earth stations?
  • Any amateur station whose licensee has filed a pre-space notification with the FCC's International Bureau
  • Only those of General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operators
  • Only those of Amateur Extra Class operators
  • Any amateur station, subject to the privileges of the class of operator license held by the control operator

FCC 97.209(a) Any amateur station may be an Earth station. A holder of any class operator license may be the control operator of an Earth station, subject to the privileges of the class of operator license held by the control operator.

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